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Eric C.
Reply with quote  #1 
I'm thinking of adding vinyl.. Happen to see this one:

https://m.facebook.com/groups/303507390016949?view=permalink&id=563576580676694

Is it a good deal? Is it a good match to Bruce's phono stage?

Can anyone recommend a good vinyl system with reasonable cost?

Thanks
Eric
Richard
Reply with quote  #2 
Maybe if you could post a picture. Me, I don't do the facebook thing. But I'm a direct drive kind of guy. I went from a Rega to a Technics 1200 years ago. No speed drift, easy set up and alignment to a wide assortment of cartridges, and durable. And of course T Sound. Two of the best purchases I've ever made.
Robbert
Reply with quote  #3 
Indeed Richard, I went from Thorens to a Technics 1200 about 12 years ago to be more precise  the SL-1210M5GSE. Installed a shelter 201 on the TS phono amp.
Take a look at the Kabusa web page.
I am very happy with sound.

Also recently purchased an Audio Technica AT-LP1240. A great record player too. also capable of 78 rpm. (reason I bought it)

My opinion could sound better then the Technics since the price is lower more monies left for the Cartridge. O yes the build in pre amp is disconnected when the switch is set to cartidge.

For sure there are better players but at what cost?. I prefer to safe some monies and buy some extra albums.
Eric C.
Reply with quote  #4 
Here is a picture

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Eric C.
Reply with quote  #5 
BTW, I also read this review about Pioneer PLX-1000 turntable (a clone of Technics 1200 with some improvement):

https://www.stereophile.com/content/gramophone-dreams-4


In the end, he said: All you need to understand is this: The Pioneer PLX-1000 turntable and tonearm, with Shure SC35C cartridge and Schiit Mani phono stage, play music unbelievably well—and cost under $900 total. In high-end audio terms, that's virtually free. I have owned a $30,000 turntable, a $30,000 cartridge, and a $30,000 phono stage with a $10,000 step-up transformer. But today, I could live the rest of my music-loving, record-collecting life quite happily with this addicting $900 front end.—Herb Reichert


Seems pretty attactive, isn't it? My question is will this combination work well with TS Phono?
Eric C.
Reply with quote  #6 
Also read this:

A word of caution: The SC35C's output of 5mV could overload some higher-gain moving-magnet phono stages, and its inductance of 425mH could make it sound bright (or rolled off) driving some phono networks—especially avoid RIAA circuits using 12AX7 tubes.

So, seems like it's not a good match to TS Phono?
Bruce Rozenblit
Reply with quote  #7 
The 5 mV output will not overload the Transcendent Phono preamp.  Nothing will.
Eric C.
Reply with quote  #8 
Thanks Bruce. How about this: "its inductance of 425mH could make it sound bright (or rolled off) driving some phono networks—especially avoid RIAA circuits using 12AX7 tubes."

TS Phono uses 12AX7 right? Not sure about RIAA..


Quote:
Originally Posted by Bruce Rozenblit
The 5 mV output will not overload the Transcendent Phono preamp.  Nothing will.
Richard
Reply with quote  #9 
Love the ad for the Robinhood turntable. Start and stop by hand, "cool". Yeah, real cool. I think any turntable will match the TS phono. But what you might like about a turntable is more important. I like the low wow & flutter, high signal to noise, imperceptible speed deviation, high torque motor, (no starting and stopping with your hand), easy vta adjustment, removable headshell for multiple easy cartridge change and etc etc of the Technics. Put a KAB tonearm damper on and you've got a high performing machine. Even the new technics GR is a bargain compared to a whole heaping helping of rubber band driven models. As for the Pioneer table. It's a Chinese table and it can't hold a candle to the performance of the Technics, new or old. Stereophile anointing praise for it carries about as much weight as if our current POTUS recommended it, to my mind. But, everyone's got their own checks and balances. If you don't plan on using a table too much maybe the Pioneer would suit your basic needs though. But hey, your hooking it up to a TS phono. I use my turntable almost exclusively though to hear music, so I wanted something good. Maybe also I chose Technics because at the time I did, Stereophile couldn't say enough bad jive about it. You might think me not too enamored of Stereophile, you'd be right.
Peter D
Reply with quote  #10 
Eric, unless you already have a large LP collection, I wouldn't recommend investing in a turntable setup. A lot of vinyl being pressed today is lifeless crap and used record shopping is a largely unrewarding exercise. 
I bought my LPs over decades before digital music was listenable, and LPs is all I listen to.
I will tell you one thing about turntables, a good belt driven TT will smoke a direct drive TT.
OK,a few more things, you don't need to spend more than $3000 for a new table, though you can spend much, much more. A worthy arm will be $1500+-. A good moving coil cart.,
$1000. 

Kelvin Tyler
Reply with quote  #11 
Hello Eric C.
The TS phono-preamp operation is well described in the product details.
The input consists of cascoded 6C45Pi tubes as a low noise initial gain stage. This is followed by a passive RIAA correction network. The final SRPP like 12AX7 output stage compensates for the gain loss in the RIAA network and is not involved itself in the correction process.
With careful construction, this preamp is the best sounding tube-based phono setup I have ever come across. Highly recommended.
Kelvin
Eric C.
Reply with quote  #12 
Thank you all who replied.

I don't have any LP collection for now - only listen to digitals from online subscription & CDs. But I have heard so many good things about Vinyl and want to try by myself.

I know TS Photo is good stuff - just don't know how good it is and what LP system to work with it (with reasonable cost ~ 1500-2000). It seems a bit more complicated than I thought, while I am still learning from this forum.

Thanks again.

Eric


Quote:
Originally Posted by Kelvin Tyler
Hello Eric C.
The TS phono-preamp operation is well described in the product details.
The input consists of cascoded 6C45Pi tubes as a low noise initial gain stage. This is followed by a passive RIAA correction network. The final SRPP like 12AX7 output stage compensates for the gain loss in the RIAA network and is not involved itself in the correction process.
With careful construction, this preamp is the best sounding tube-based phono setup I have ever come across. Highly recommended.
Kelvin
Eric C.
Reply with quote  #13 
Too bad I can't edit my post. It's Phono not Photo. Sorry for the typo.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Eric C.
Thank you all who replied.

I don't have any LP collection for now - only listen to digitals from online subscription & CDs. But I have heard so many good things about Vinyl and want to try by myself.

I know TS Photo is good stuff - just don't know how good it is and what LP system to work with it (with reasonable cost ~ 1500-2000). It seems a bit more complicated than I thought, while I am still learning from this forum.

Thanks again.

Eric


Robbert
Reply with quote  #14 
Hi Eric:

The TS phono is one of the best you can get. It is detailed, accurate and musical. I have one too.

I understand your confusion. We all still have that even when we are experienced. We have our opinions we have our experiences. Thats what I like from TS stuff it is what your ears hear what counts for bruce.

We all know if you throw $$$ you can always can get a little better.

It could be possible that you buy this record player which could also be your last. Buy a reputable brand so spare parts like belts (if you go belt drive) are not an issue.

I know some people will only wanting belt driven.
I came from belt driven I am now direct drive. The technics SL-1210M5GSEis what I have now for a long time.

Are there better sounding record players?? yes but for lots of more monies. What I like from the technics, build as a tank. You can adjust the arm height, this is pretty important not all cartridges are the same heights and what if you want to use a different mat?


Since you are starting get a good record reputable player and reasonable cartridge. The technics is shy from $1000 and get a cartridge from about $200 to $400. Once you are deeper into vinyl you could get a better cartridge.

You can spend over a $100,000  on a record playing system, yes it will sound most likely way better then my system. (I do not have that money any way) But do not you want to buy some records too?

I hope this helps a little

Good luck with your search

Robbert


Richard
Reply with quote  #15 
Hello Eric. Have you had any experience with a turntable, using or listening? If you want to invest in this format you might want a reference to aspire towards. So, friends or some means to hear what this set up sounds like, and what you can use to equal or better the experience. You might find that maybe it's not worth all the fuss to get one set up and use if your main reference has been the current digital offerings. Vinyl set up requires a certain amount of detailed cartridge alignment. And does your speaker and amplifier set up allow for the spl level your use to hearing with digital when using vinyl. I think you could do it within your budget. Experienced users of vinyl all have their preferences and the drive systems debate of a turntable shouldn't limit what your minimum outlay should be for a start up system. I think the 2nd hand market is a good way to enter into the foray. But you're going to have to figure out what trade off or variable you can deal with, including the TS phono to add this format to your system. I found that I like no variation with speed issues and a neutral baseline that doesn't add coloration to the cartridge in use, (no feedback). That led me to direct drive. The turntable you showed for sale to me didn't offer a potential of value vs performance based on what the probable outlay for it would be. Starting and stopping the platter with your hand just doesn't give much confidence for stable speed retention during record play.
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